This is an interesting article in Men’s Fitness this month by Tyler Graham. I’ve been doing a lot of reading on this way of eating, and I’m finding much discussion online. I did the Ketogenic diet about 2 years ago, rebooted my metabolism and lost 20 pounds. I gained some weight back recently so decided to give it another go.  This time around I’m finding that my fat loss is still fast, but my workouts are suffering.   My strength has increased, but any workout  where i need intensity and stamina, my times are slower.  So my crossfit wods have been slower but in general I feel good.  I don’t think the Ketogenic way of eating long term may be the best, but research keeps showing how it is so beneficial for diabetics.  Most of the research done for athletics, has to do with endurance athletes not high intensity athletes…  the Jury is out, but I thought I would share. xo marta

Here is the article from Men’s Fitness:

Timothy Noakes, M.D., is an emeritus professor in the Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine at the University of Cape Town. While his name may not ring a bell here in the U.S., he’s a full-blown celebrity in his native South Africa and one of the most accomplished exer- cise physiologists on the planet. You can’t walk by a restau- rant in Cape Town that doesn’t offer a “Noakes option”—say, an avocado stuffed with breakfast sausage and eggs, or a double cheeseburger with lettuce sans bun—and evidence of his teachings seems to be everywhere, mostly in the form of the nation’s best-known athletes, including ageless golfing legend Gary Player and eight-time Ironman World Champion Paula Newby-Fraser. In fact, Noakes’ celebrity these days is such that he’s even been pulled into South African presidential politics: To echo the country’s papers of record, “Is President Jacob Zuma’s and his wife’s dramatic weight loss a result of the Noakes Diet?” No one is sure about the president, but his wife, definitely: She’s lost 66 pounds following the Noakes plaTo high-performing athletes, Noakes preaches that the bedrock tenet of endurance athletic nutrition—that winning performance is best fueled by eating lots of carbohydrates—is simply wrong. Instead, he believes athletes can alter their bodies so that their metabolism burns fat as a primary fuel source, a physiological process known as ketosis, either from stored body fat or from the foods they eat every day. For non-athletes and anyone trying to lose weight or keep it off, Noakes’ advice is that eating a high-fat diet, with few if any refined carbs and as little sugar as possible, will switch on the same fat-burning system and keep your body lean and your weight stable without making you hungry. According to Noakes and a growing number of nutritionists, physiologists, and biohackers, when you’re in a state of ketosis—best attained through a strict “ketogenic diet”—good things happen.

Sometimes, amazingly good things.

Two years ago, LeBron James famously lost 25 pounds and upped his late-game endurance by cutting carbs and sugars from his diet. Tim Ferriss, the author of the Four-Hour self-improvement book series, followed a strict keto diet to cure his Lyme disease, and performs a long multi-day fast every four months as a means, he says, of pushing ketosis further and starving incipient pre-cancerous cells of sugar (more on that later). Last summer, Sami Inkinen, the ultrafit co-founder of real estate juggernaut Trulia, rowed with his wife from California to Hawaii in record time on a keto diet, to promote high-fat eating and raise awareness about the dangers of too much sugar. The Keto Diet, say its ardent supporters, is a natural way to literally reprogram your metabo- lism and transition to an upgraded operating system. You’ll ultimately feel better and perform better, and your body fat will plummet.

read the rest of the article here:

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1 RM Backsquat – take 15 minutes to establish a max

21-15-9
Dips
Burpees
Goblet squat 24/16
farmer’s walk – big section of gym – 4 walks 45/25

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