The stereotypical media portrayal of aging is a person who complains of joint pain, demonstrates a restricted range of motion and moves with a slow, unsteady gait.

A well-documented correlation can be found among age, gait speed and stability: As we age, speed and stability go down (7,14). This is not in reference to athletic performance of older athletes but to walking and simple standing tasks among the general public. One part of the stereotype is seemingly supported by science.

As for range of motion in well-seasoned joints, again the literature is replete with papers that present a correlation between advancing age and reduction in flexibility (10,12). It appears that another part of the age-related stereotype is underpinned by science.

Stereotypical aging characters in books and scripts often use colorful colloquialisms to call attention to the presence of pain and how they feel about it. In the scientific literature, the association between aging and pain is present (8), but some interesting physiological and psychological quirks and inconsistencies bear more consideration than given here. Overall, the stereotypical presentation of joint pain appears to be supported by data, at least in part.

Check out the rest here:

https://journal.crossfit.com/article/stereotype-kilgore

 


Romanian Deadlift  work up in weight 5 x 5

4 rounds:
100′ Walking Lunge OH DB 35/25
15 Deadlifts 185/135
10 1 ARM press – DB 35/25 first R arm then L arm

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